Canadian Lung Association Blog

Monthly Archives: July 2014

My Experience With Lung Cancer – Part 4: What can be next??

picture of Terry

[See previous blogs – Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3] I finished the previous blog two weeks ago, after having radiotherapy to the lesions in my brain, and feeling pretty positive again. And while trying to ignore the swelling in my left leg. It couldn’t be ignored for very long, and by that afternoon I was diagnosed with another complication of cancer, a deep vein thrombosis. This is a blood clot that forms in the deeper, inside veins of the leg and in my case the thigh. It can occur in other situations besides cancer, such as after surgery

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Posted in Lung Cancer, Stories

Remembering Dr. Bill Jeanes

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One of Canada’s respiratory health pioneers, Dr. Bill Jeanes, passed away on July 1 in Ottawa at the age of 95. As a member of the Canadian Lung Association staff, I had the privilege of meeting Dr. Jeanes for the first time in 2001 when he came to our office in Ottawa during the Christmas season, armed with photos and other memorabilia from the past. As the years went by, Dr. Jeanes would make his seasonal visit and it was always such a pleasant opportunity to hear about how our organization was formed and listen to stories about the people

Posted in Stories, TB, volunteer

My Experience With Lung Cancer – Part 3: A Lousy Week

picture of Terry

[In Part 1, Terry described her diagnosis and initial treatment. In Part 2, she discussed the stigma of lung cancer.] I wrote my last section about a week ago, when I was feeling a lot better – it is easier to be positive in those circumstances. This past week has been really tough – I had a routinely scheduled MRI of my brain on Monday, and learned that, despite the treatment, there are several small metastatic lesions in my brain.  Although I knew that the drug I am on does not reach the brain as well as other parts of

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Posted in Lung Cancer, Stories

Apps to use during forest fire season

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As forest fires continue to burn throughout Western and Northern Canada this summer, residents of and visitors to Alberta may experience health effects due to smoke in the air.  On average, Alberta sees 1,600 forest fires burn between the months of April and October of a given year. It is also possible for forest fires burning in British Columbia and the Northwest Territories to prompt air quality advisories in Alberta. Not only do forest fires pose danger to natural habitat, but also to human health. To learn about: the health effects caused by forest fire smoke; ways to reduce exposure

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Posted in Air Quality, Asthma, COPD, Lung Health

Forest Fires and Lung Health

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Forest fires are often a concern in Canada, especially during dry, hot summers. People all over Canada may be affected by the smoke from forest fires. The Canadian Lung Association urges those with lung disease such as asthma and COPD to monitor their breathing and avoid exposure to smoke. If breathing problems develop, refer to your action plan or call your health-care provider. What type of health effects can be caused by forest fire smoke? For someone without lung problems, wood smoke can: irritate eyes, lungs, throat and sinuses increase the risk of heart attacks trigger headaches and allergies reduce

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Posted in Air Quality, Asthma, COPD, Lung Health

My Experience With Lung Cancer – Part 2

[In Part 1, Terry described her diagnosis and initial treatment.] First, thank you so much to my colleagues and friends who have written in response to this blog. Your support and good wishes help me enormously, especially during the moments when I feel discouraged. I met an elderly patient who recently had major surgery for lung cancer. I was struggling to do my 30 minutes on the treadmill, and she just leaned over and said “Just have to keep going – don’t let yourself give up”.  I think that is the key – we can’t always have a positive attitude,

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Posted in Lung Cancer, Research, Stories

Quitting One Step at a Time

A group of individuals from Prince Albert are making great strides in their lung health one step at a time.  They came together with two common goals.  They all wanted to quit smoking and become more physically active. Together under the leadership of Donna Turner and Valerie Borsos, two Respiratory Therapists and Certified Respiratory Educators from The Prince Albert Co-operative Health Centre, they became a team that worked towards becoming tobacco-free and trained to walk or run a five km distance.  “We are always trying to think about new methods to help people quit smoking.  We wanted to find a

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Posted in Smoking & Tobacco, Stories